As a result of the COVID-19 epidemic, the vital importance of digital infrastructure in delivering critical civic, economic, and governmental services has been clearer than ever before. In both business and society, there is now widespread recognition that availability, dependability, affordability, and long-term viability are all critical characteristics of digital infrastructure that must be assured in the short and long term. Simultaneously, cyber-physical convergence is accelerating, emphasising the need for sophisticated network technology to serve use cases that blur the lines between physical and digital worlds.

Without the existing capabilities of both mobile and fixed communications infrastructure, the dramatic acceleration in the adoption rate of digitalization during the pandemic would not have been feasible. In the future, 5G will be the primary digital infrastructure for customers with mobile and fixed wireless home connections who want to use augmented/virtual reality and AI-based services. 5G delivers better performance, edge computing, built-in Internet of Things optimization, workflow automation, and network slicing for Service Level Agreement-based QoS for companies – particularly those that are already transitioning to cloud services.

The use of cloud technology will become increasingly important. Many network operators have begun to include cloud-native technology into their networks, such as cloud-native standalone cores and cloud RANs with an open layered design. The availability of high-performance digital infrastructure services that provide an open, interoperable, trustworthy, secure, efficiently automated, and safe physical world is critical for future growth in this field. Beyond standard communication services, the network will offer additional elements including multimodal digital representations, context awareness, and observability to help users gain insight. The distributed communication network services, such as ubiquitous connectivity infused with intelligent, real-time computation, will operate in tandem with dispersed endpoints and cloud infrastructures to build the digital infrastructure's future capabilities.

The openness of technological and business interfaces will be the basic concept for the growth of the digital infrastructure, ensuring an open marketplace. This openness will be critical for independent innovation both within and on top of the digital infrastructure, allowing for the development of the future business platform. Business-driven investments, solid collaborations, and openness in the digital infrastructure will all contribute to the ecosystem's evolution.

Without the existing capabilities of both mobile and fixed communications infrastructure, the dramatic acceleration in the adoption rate of digitalization during the pandemic would not have been feasible. In the future, 5G will be the primary digital infrastructure for customers with mobile and fixed wireless home connections who want to use augmented/virtual reality and AI-based services. 5G delivers better performance, edge computing, built-in Internet of Things optimization, workflow automation, and network slicing for Service Level Agreement-based QoS for companies – particularly those that are already transitioning to cloud services.

Trend #1: Networked reality's digital depiction

We are already enabling the physical and digital worlds to converge into an augmented reality that meets human and machine communication demands with 5G. Because humans and physical things can only perceive the physical world in their immediate surroundings, the existence of local sensors, actuators, and networks is critical. Digital representations of individuals, real things, and their environs enable the merging of physical and digital worlds.

Trend No. 2: Adaptable, unrestricted connection

One of the main objectives of 6G access is to provide adaptive, unlimited connection that allows for the construction of a flexible, strong, and resilient network. Users and apps should be able to focus on the job at hand at all times and in any location, and the network should be able to adapt and support their requirements. Multi-vendor interfaces will maintain openness in networks and the ecosystem as a whole while reducing system complexity.

Trend No. 3: Integrity of reliable systems is the third trend.

To minimise the enlarged danger area, 6G networks will enable billions of embeddable devices and provide trustworthy, always-available connections with end-to-end assurance. The network's ability to deliver secure services will be based on maintaining and verifying compliance with security, safety, resilience, and privacy requirements. AI-powered automation will be employed across the product life cycle, including development, deployment, and operations. Artificial intelligence (AI) will also be utilised for autonomous root-cause analysis, threat detection, and attack response, as well as unintended disruptions. These technologies will also enhance service availability.

Trend No. 4: The fourth trend is federated cognitive networks.

If the 5G network automation route is followed, the future network will become cognitive, watching and responding independently to enhance its performance. Full automation of network administration and configuration chores will be possible with cognitive 6G networks, allowing operations and maintenance workers to oversee the network.

Trend No. 5: The fifth trend is the creation of a unified network computing fabric.

The fusion of internet, telecommunications, media, and information technologies will result in the establishment of a single, worldwide system of interconnected components. The network computing fabric enables ecosystem unification, application management, execution environments, and network and compute capability exposure. 6G will function as the network's controller, including everything from simple devices to sophisticated cyber-physical systems. 6G will also combine storage, computing, and communication to form a distributed unified network compute fabric. This fabric will offer service providers with access to tools and services that are not currently available.